......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 OSCAR CHARLESTON is considered by many to be the greatest of the Negro Leagues' superstars.  He has been compared to Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb, and his play in center field evoked memories of Tris Speaker.  Like Ruth, Charleston had a barrel chest and skinny legs, and as a young player he could run like the wind.  He positioned himself very shallow in center field, reminiscent of Speaker, and used his speed to track down balls hit over his head.  Charleston was also notoriously aggressive and was frequently involved in fights both on and off the field, but he remained a fan favorite for his talent and enthusiasm.  As a player, he seemingly had no weaknesses; a brilliant center fielder, had excellent power and often hit over .400.  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE: approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​  PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

OSCAR CHARLESTON is considered by many to be the greatest of the Negro Leagues' superstars.  He has been compared to Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb, and his play in center field evoked memories of Tris Speaker.  Like Ruth, Charleston had a barrel chest and skinny legs, and as a young player he could run like the wind.  He positioned himself very shallow in center field, reminiscent of Speaker, and used his speed to track down balls hit over his head.  Charleston was also notoriously aggressive and was frequently involved in fights both on and off the field, but he remained a fan favorite for his talent and enthusiasm.  As a player, he seemingly had no weaknesses; a brilliant center fielder, had excellent power and often hit over .400.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE: approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​

PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

 ​Side view of OSCAR CHARLESTON

​Side view of OSCAR CHARLESTON

 JIMMIE FOXX joined the Philadelphia A's as a muscular seventeen-year-old farm boy inn 1925, and was taken under Connie Mack's wing.  Nicknamed "The Beast," he was blessed with the strength, grace and balance of a great linebacker.  He became the most feared power hitter of the 1930's, winning three Most Valuable Player Awards.  He hit 58 homers in 1932, won the Triple Crown in 1933, and drove in 175 runs in 1938.  A gregarious, easy-going man, Foxx took his success for granted, which made his life difficult after he was through as a player.  ​  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE: ​ approx. 7" x 4 1/2" x 4"  ​PRICE: $50 + $8 shipping/handling  ​

JIMMIE FOXX joined the Philadelphia A's as a muscular seventeen-year-old farm boy inn 1925, and was taken under Connie Mack's wing.  Nicknamed "The Beast," he was blessed with the strength, grace and balance of a great linebacker.  He became the most feared power hitter of the 1930's, winning three Most Valuable Player Awards.  He hit 58 homers in 1932, won the Triple Crown in 1933, and drove in 175 runs in 1938.  A gregarious, easy-going man, Foxx took his success for granted, which made his life difficult after he was through as a player.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE: ​ approx. 7" x 4 1/2" x 4"

​PRICE: $50 + $8 shipping/handling

 ​Side view of JIMMIE FOXX

​Side view of JIMMIE FOXX

 JOSH GIBSON was born in a small town in Georgia.  Although he was still a teenager when he joined the Homestead Grays, a Negro League team, he was an immediate sensation.  His presence made the Grays a powerhouse.  Gibson was a stocky man with tremendous strength in every part of his body. He was a right-handed power hitter, but he also threw well, and he was quick. He played for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, the Trujillo All-Stars, the Grays again, and for Veracruz, Mexico, leading all of these teams to championships.  He was probably the greatest catcher of all time.  Gibson's health began to fail in 1943.  He died following a stroke, one month after his 35th birthday, just weeks before Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers.  ​  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x 4" x 3 1/2"​  PRICE:   CURRENTLY OUT-OF-STOCK  ​

JOSH GIBSON was born in a small town in Georgia.  Although he was still a teenager when he joined the Homestead Grays, a Negro League team, he was an immediate sensation.  His presence made the Grays a powerhouse.  Gibson was a stocky man with tremendous strength in every part of his body. He was a right-handed power hitter, but he also threw well, and he was quick. He played for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, the Trujillo All-Stars, the Grays again, and for Veracruz, Mexico, leading all of these teams to championships.  He was probably the greatest catcher of all time.  Gibson's health began to fail in 1943.  He died following a stroke, one month after his 35th birthday, just weeks before Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x 4" x 3 1/2"​

PRICE:   CURRENTLY OUT-OF-STOCK

 ​Side view of JOSH GIBSON

​Side view of JOSH GIBSON

 KING KELLY was "King" for the exact same reasons that Elvis was; he was baseball's most famous and beloved player until Babe Ruth.  He reached the major leagues in 1878, and joined Cap Anson's Chicago team two years later.  The White Stockings (now the Cubs) won the pennant in Kelly's first three years with the team.  Kelly led the league in batting in 1884 and 1886 with averages of .354 and .388, and also led the league three years in a row in runs scored.  He played every position on the field many times, including pitcher, but played more at catcher and in right field.  Kelly was a very good hitter and a quick-thinking and imaginative fielder, but he was most famous as a baserunner and a personality.  Kelly is believed to have invented sliding.  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x 4" x 3 1/2"​  PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

KING KELLY was "King" for the exact same reasons that Elvis was; he was baseball's most famous and beloved player until Babe Ruth.  He reached the major leagues in 1878, and joined Cap Anson's Chicago team two years later.  The White Stockings (now the Cubs) won the pennant in Kelly's first three years with the team.  Kelly led the league in batting in 1884 and 1886 with averages of .354 and .388, and also led the league three years in a row in runs scored.  He played every position on the field many times, including pitcher, but played more at catcher and in right field.  Kelly was a very good hitter and a quick-thinking and imaginative fielder, but he was most famous as a baserunner and a personality.  Kelly is believed to have invented sliding.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x 4" x 3 1/2"​

PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

 ​Side view of KING KELLY

​Side view of KING KELLY

 Born in  Rhode Island in 1874, NAP LAJOIE had finished his formal education and entered the job market before he discovered baseball at the age of ten.  After a decade of working, Lajoie broke into professional baseball in 1896, and then shot to the major leagues in less than a year.  In 1901 Lajoie became the first star player to jump to the American League; his success and popularity helped to establish the American League.  A likeable, cheerful man, and a gracefu infielder, Lajoie was for many years the immensely popular manager of the Cleveland baseball team now known as the Indians, but then called the "Naps" in his honor.  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x ​ 4" x 3 1/2" (depth)  PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

Born in  Rhode Island in 1874, NAP LAJOIE had finished his formal education and entered the job market before he discovered baseball at the age of ten.  After a decade of working, Lajoie broke into professional baseball in 1896, and then shot to the major leagues in less than a year.  In 1901 Lajoie became the first star player to jump to the American League; his success and popularity helped to establish the American League.  A likeable, cheerful man, and a gracefu infielder, Lajoie was for many years the immensely popular manager of the Cleveland baseball team now known as the Indians, but then called the "Naps" in his honor.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x ​ 4" x 3 1/2" (depth)

PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

 ​Side view of NAP LAJOIE

​Side view of NAP LAJOIE

  TRIS SPEAKER , known as the Gray Eagle, was a very graceful center fielder who was the chief rival of Ty Cobb for the distinction of being the greatest player in baseball before the emergence of Babe Ruth.   Speaker hit over .380 as a regular five times and has held the record for career doubles since 1925, one of the longest standing records in baseball, but was most famous for his defense in center field.  His great ability to go back on a fly ball enabled him to play very shallow and turn balls hit over second base into outs.    ​MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE: approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​  ​PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling      ​

TRIS SPEAKER, known as the Gray Eagle, was a very graceful center fielder who was the chief rival of Ty Cobb for the distinction of being the greatest player in baseball before the emergence of Babe Ruth.   Speaker hit over .380 as a regular five times and has held the record for career doubles since 1925, one of the longest standing records in baseball, but was most famous for his defense in center field.  His great ability to go back on a fly ball enabled him to play very shallow and turn balls hit over second base into outs.  

​MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE: approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​

​PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

 ​Side view of TRIS SPEAKER

​Side view of TRIS SPEAKER

 JOHANNES PETER WAGNER was born near Pittsburgh in 1874 and joined his father in the coal mines at the age of 12.  A powerfully built man with immense hands and almost unnaturally long arms, Wagner became the greatest player in the history of the Pittsburgh Pirates.  He was a career .327 hitter, and perhaps the best defensive player in the history of the game.  He led Pittsburgh to four National League pennants.  A fun loving, gregarious man and an incurable story-teller, Wagner played in the majors until he was well past 40, and remained a part of the Pirates' organization for the rest of his life.​  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:   approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​  PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling  ​

JOHANNES PETER WAGNER was born near Pittsburgh in 1874 and joined his father in the coal mines at the age of 12.  A powerfully built man with immense hands and almost unnaturally long arms, Wagner became the greatest player in the history of the Pittsburgh Pirates.  He was a career .327 hitter, and perhaps the best defensive player in the history of the game.  He led Pittsburgh to four National League pennants.  A fun loving, gregarious man and an incurable story-teller, Wagner played in the majors until he was well past 40, and remained a part of the Pirates' organization for the rest of his life.​

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:   approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​

PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

 ​Side view of HONUS WAGNER

​Side view of HONUS WAGNER

 HACK WILSON looked like he had been raised on a planet that had far more gravity than earth.  He was very short, 5' 6", but had massive features--a huge jaw, a beer barrel body perched on dancer's feet.  Despite the odd architecture, Wilson ran well, and he was enormously strong.  Troubled most of his life by drink and a hot temper, Wilson hooked up in 1926 with Chicago Cubs' manager Joe McCarthy.  Under McCarthy's guidance, Wilson for five seasons became one of the greatest hitters of all time.  In 1930 at age 30, he drove in 190 runs, a major league record which has not been approached in more than 60 years.  McCarthy left the Cubs in September, 1930, and Wilson's career screeched to a halt.  He died in Baltimore in 1948.  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:  approx. ​7" x 4" x 4"  PRICE: $50 + $8 shipping/handling

HACK WILSON looked like he had been raised on a planet that had far more gravity than earth.  He was very short, 5' 6", but had massive features--a huge jaw, a beer barrel body perched on dancer's feet.  Despite the odd architecture, Wilson ran well, and he was enormously strong.  Troubled most of his life by drink and a hot temper, Wilson hooked up in 1926 with Chicago Cubs' manager Joe McCarthy.  Under McCarthy's guidance, Wilson for five seasons became one of the greatest hitters of all time.  In 1930 at age 30, he drove in 190 runs, a major league record which has not been approached in more than 60 years.  McCarthy left the Cubs in September, 1930, and Wilson's career screeched to a halt.  He died in Baltimore in 1948.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:  approx. ​7" x 4" x 4"

PRICE: $50 + $8 shipping/handling

 ​Side view of HACK WILSON

​Side view of HACK WILSON

OSCAR CHARLESTON is considered by many to be the greatest of the Negro Leagues' superstars.  He has been compared to Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb, and his play in center field evoked memories of Tris Speaker.  Like Ruth, Charleston had a barrel chest and skinny legs, and as a young player he could run like the wind.  He positioned himself very shallow in center field, reminiscent of Speaker, and used his speed to track down balls hit over his head.  Charleston was also notoriously aggressive and was frequently involved in fights both on and off the field, but he remained a fan favorite for his talent and enthusiasm.  As a player, he seemingly had no weaknesses; a brilliant center fielder, had excellent power and often hit over .400.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE: approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​

PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

​Side view of OSCAR CHARLESTON

JIMMIE FOXX joined the Philadelphia A's as a muscular seventeen-year-old farm boy inn 1925, and was taken under Connie Mack's wing.  Nicknamed "The Beast," he was blessed with the strength, grace and balance of a great linebacker.  He became the most feared power hitter of the 1930's, winning three Most Valuable Player Awards.  He hit 58 homers in 1932, won the Triple Crown in 1933, and drove in 175 runs in 1938.  A gregarious, easy-going man, Foxx took his success for granted, which made his life difficult after he was through as a player.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE: ​ approx. 7" x 4 1/2" x 4"

​PRICE: $50 + $8 shipping/handling

​Side view of JIMMIE FOXX

JOSH GIBSON was born in a small town in Georgia.  Although he was still a teenager when he joined the Homestead Grays, a Negro League team, he was an immediate sensation.  His presence made the Grays a powerhouse.  Gibson was a stocky man with tremendous strength in every part of his body. He was a right-handed power hitter, but he also threw well, and he was quick. He played for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, the Trujillo All-Stars, the Grays again, and for Veracruz, Mexico, leading all of these teams to championships.  He was probably the greatest catcher of all time.  Gibson's health began to fail in 1943.  He died following a stroke, one month after his 35th birthday, just weeks before Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x 4" x 3 1/2"​

PRICE:   CURRENTLY OUT-OF-STOCK

​Side view of JOSH GIBSON

KING KELLY was "King" for the exact same reasons that Elvis was; he was baseball's most famous and beloved player until Babe Ruth.  He reached the major leagues in 1878, and joined Cap Anson's Chicago team two years later.  The White Stockings (now the Cubs) won the pennant in Kelly's first three years with the team.  Kelly led the league in batting in 1884 and 1886 with averages of .354 and .388, and also led the league three years in a row in runs scored.  He played every position on the field many times, including pitcher, but played more at catcher and in right field.  Kelly was a very good hitter and a quick-thinking and imaginative fielder, but he was most famous as a baserunner and a personality.  Kelly is believed to have invented sliding.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x 4" x 3 1/2"​

PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

​Side view of KING KELLY

Born in  Rhode Island in 1874, NAP LAJOIE had finished his formal education and entered the job market before he discovered baseball at the age of ten.  After a decade of working, Lajoie broke into professional baseball in 1896, and then shot to the major leagues in less than a year.  In 1901 Lajoie became the first star player to jump to the American League; his success and popularity helped to establish the American League.  A likeable, cheerful man, and a gracefu infielder, Lajoie was for many years the immensely popular manager of the Cleveland baseball team now known as the Indians, but then called the "Naps" in his honor.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x ​ 4" x 3 1/2" (depth)

PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

​Side view of NAP LAJOIE

TRIS SPEAKER, known as the Gray Eagle, was a very graceful center fielder who was the chief rival of Ty Cobb for the distinction of being the greatest player in baseball before the emergence of Babe Ruth.   Speaker hit over .380 as a regular five times and has held the record for career doubles since 1925, one of the longest standing records in baseball, but was most famous for his defense in center field.  His great ability to go back on a fly ball enabled him to play very shallow and turn balls hit over second base into outs.  

​MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE: approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​

​PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

​Side view of TRIS SPEAKER

JOHANNES PETER WAGNER was born near Pittsburgh in 1874 and joined his father in the coal mines at the age of 12.  A powerfully built man with immense hands and almost unnaturally long arms, Wagner became the greatest player in the history of the Pittsburgh Pirates.  He was a career .327 hitter, and perhaps the best defensive player in the history of the game.  He led Pittsburgh to four National League pennants.  A fun loving, gregarious man and an incurable story-teller, Wagner played in the majors until he was well past 40, and remained a part of the Pirates' organization for the rest of his life.​

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:   approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​

PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling

​Side view of HONUS WAGNER

HACK WILSON looked like he had been raised on a planet that had far more gravity than earth.  He was very short, 5' 6", but had massive features--a huge jaw, a beer barrel body perched on dancer's feet.  Despite the odd architecture, Wilson ran well, and he was enormously strong.  Troubled most of his life by drink and a hot temper, Wilson hooked up in 1926 with Chicago Cubs' manager Joe McCarthy.  Under McCarthy's guidance, Wilson for five seasons became one of the greatest hitters of all time.  In 1930 at age 30, he drove in 190 runs, a major league record which has not been approached in more than 60 years.  McCarthy left the Cubs in September, 1930, and Wilson's career screeched to a halt.  He died in Baltimore in 1948.

MEDIUM:  Porcelain

SIZE:  approx. ​7" x 4" x 4"

PRICE: $50 + $8 shipping/handling

​Side view of HACK WILSON

 OSCAR CHARLESTON is considered by many to be the greatest of the Negro Leagues' superstars.  He has been compared to Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb, and his play in center field evoked memories of Tris Speaker.  Like Ruth, Charleston had a barrel chest and skinny legs, and as a young player he could run like the wind.  He positioned himself very shallow in center field, reminiscent of Speaker, and used his speed to track down balls hit over his head.  Charleston was also notoriously aggressive and was frequently involved in fights both on and off the field, but he remained a fan favorite for his talent and enthusiasm.  As a player, he seemingly had no weaknesses; a brilliant center fielder, had excellent power and often hit over .400.  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE: approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​  PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling
 ​Side view of OSCAR CHARLESTON
 JIMMIE FOXX joined the Philadelphia A's as a muscular seventeen-year-old farm boy inn 1925, and was taken under Connie Mack's wing.  Nicknamed "The Beast," he was blessed with the strength, grace and balance of a great linebacker.  He became the most feared power hitter of the 1930's, winning three Most Valuable Player Awards.  He hit 58 homers in 1932, won the Triple Crown in 1933, and drove in 175 runs in 1938.  A gregarious, easy-going man, Foxx took his success for granted, which made his life difficult after he was through as a player.  ​  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE: ​ approx. 7" x 4 1/2" x 4"  ​PRICE: $50 + $8 shipping/handling  ​
 ​Side view of JIMMIE FOXX
 JOSH GIBSON was born in a small town in Georgia.  Although he was still a teenager when he joined the Homestead Grays, a Negro League team, he was an immediate sensation.  His presence made the Grays a powerhouse.  Gibson was a stocky man with tremendous strength in every part of his body. He was a right-handed power hitter, but he also threw well, and he was quick. He played for the Pittsburgh Crawfords, the Trujillo All-Stars, the Grays again, and for Veracruz, Mexico, leading all of these teams to championships.  He was probably the greatest catcher of all time.  Gibson's health began to fail in 1943.  He died following a stroke, one month after his 35th birthday, just weeks before Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers.  ​  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x 4" x 3 1/2"​  PRICE:   CURRENTLY OUT-OF-STOCK  ​
 ​Side view of JOSH GIBSON
 KING KELLY was "King" for the exact same reasons that Elvis was; he was baseball's most famous and beloved player until Babe Ruth.  He reached the major leagues in 1878, and joined Cap Anson's Chicago team two years later.  The White Stockings (now the Cubs) won the pennant in Kelly's first three years with the team.  Kelly led the league in batting in 1884 and 1886 with averages of .354 and .388, and also led the league three years in a row in runs scored.  He played every position on the field many times, including pitcher, but played more at catcher and in right field.  Kelly was a very good hitter and a quick-thinking and imaginative fielder, but he was most famous as a baserunner and a personality.  Kelly is believed to have invented sliding.  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x 4" x 3 1/2"​  PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling
 ​Side view of KING KELLY
 Born in  Rhode Island in 1874, NAP LAJOIE had finished his formal education and entered the job market before he discovered baseball at the age of ten.  After a decade of working, Lajoie broke into professional baseball in 1896, and then shot to the major leagues in less than a year.  In 1901 Lajoie became the first star player to jump to the American League; his success and popularity helped to establish the American League.  A likeable, cheerful man, and a gracefu infielder, Lajoie was for many years the immensely popular manager of the Cleveland baseball team now known as the Indians, but then called the "Naps" in his honor.  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:  approx. 6 1/2" x ​ 4" x 3 1/2" (depth)  PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling
 ​Side view of NAP LAJOIE
  TRIS SPEAKER , known as the Gray Eagle, was a very graceful center fielder who was the chief rival of Ty Cobb for the distinction of being the greatest player in baseball before the emergence of Babe Ruth.   Speaker hit over .380 as a regular five times and has held the record for career doubles since 1925, one of the longest standing records in baseball, but was most famous for his defense in center field.  His great ability to go back on a fly ball enabled him to play very shallow and turn balls hit over second base into outs.    ​MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE: approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​  ​PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling      ​
 ​Side view of TRIS SPEAKER
 JOHANNES PETER WAGNER was born near Pittsburgh in 1874 and joined his father in the coal mines at the age of 12.  A powerfully built man with immense hands and almost unnaturally long arms, Wagner became the greatest player in the history of the Pittsburgh Pirates.  He was a career .327 hitter, and perhaps the best defensive player in the history of the game.  He led Pittsburgh to four National League pennants.  A fun loving, gregarious man and an incurable story-teller, Wagner played in the majors until he was well past 40, and remained a part of the Pirates' organization for the rest of his life.​  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:   approx. 7" x 4" x 4"​  PRICE:  $50 + $8 shipping/handling  ​
 ​Side view of HONUS WAGNER
 HACK WILSON looked like he had been raised on a planet that had far more gravity than earth.  He was very short, 5' 6", but had massive features--a huge jaw, a beer barrel body perched on dancer's feet.  Despite the odd architecture, Wilson ran well, and he was enormously strong.  Troubled most of his life by drink and a hot temper, Wilson hooked up in 1926 with Chicago Cubs' manager Joe McCarthy.  Under McCarthy's guidance, Wilson for five seasons became one of the greatest hitters of all time.  In 1930 at age 30, he drove in 190 runs, a major league record which has not been approached in more than 60 years.  McCarthy left the Cubs in September, 1930, and Wilson's career screeched to a halt.  He died in Baltimore in 1948.  MEDIUM:  Porcelain  SIZE:  approx. ​7" x 4" x 4"  PRICE: $50 + $8 shipping/handling
 ​Side view of HACK WILSON